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Pregnancy Tea

So, the first thing I do every evening before bed is prepare my pregnancy support infusion. I allow it to steep overnight to extract the maximum amount of vitamins and minerals from the herbs.

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The next morning, I strain the infusion and sip on it throughout the day.

For every blog, website, or source you go to, you will find a different recipe for pregnancy tea.  One thing I can guarantee they all have in common is Red Raspberry Leaf (RRL). RRL is like the workhorse of herbs for female reproductive health.  It has been used for centuries as a uterine tonic. Along with being rich in vitamins and minerals (calcium, iron, phospohorus, potassium, and vitamins B, C, and E) RRL’s active ingredient is the alkaloid fragarine. Fragarine (when combined with the rest of the plant’s constituents-NOT isolated as an extract) tones and relaxes the pelvic and uterine muscles.

The next herb that I always include in my pregnancy tea blends (and drink it almost daily when NOT pregnant) is Stinging Nettles.  I love nettles for it’s high mineral content. It is a great source of iron, calcium, Vitamin A, and chlorophyll. It is also excellent for water retention, which is a common complaint during pregnancy.

Dandelion Leaf is typically in my blend, as well. It is also rich in vitamins and minerals (vitamins A and C, iron, calcium and potassium). It is also amazing for your digestive system and is an excellent liver tonic.

Next on my list is Oatstraw. This is one of my absolute favorite plants to work with. Oatstraw helps with dryness (you know what I’m talking about!) and is a mild nerve tonic. It is so nice and relaxing without being a sedative.  It is also very rich in calcium and magnesium (hence the relaxation-making!).

Finally, I love to add some Rose Hips. Rose hips are chocked full of vitamin C and taste delicious!

Recipe

  • 3 parts Red Raspberry Leaf
  • 3 parts Stinging Nettles
  • 2 parts Dandelion Leaf
  • 2 parts Oatstraw
  • 1 part Red Clover
  • 1 part Rose Hips

Mix thoroughly. Use about 1/2 cup per quart of boiling water. After you strain it, you can sweeten however you’d like. Lately, I’ve been adding some lemon juice and fresh grated ginger to my infusions. I’ve been craving this lemon-ginger tea, but it has hibiscus in it, and I’m not too keen on using hibiscus during pregnancy unless blood pressure issues are present.

This blend is also wonderful for postpartum, breastfeeding, or really anytime you are feeling like you need to be nourished. Hot or cold, steeped for 30 minutes or 8 hours, sweetened or not-this tea is definitely a must have for women.

 

2 thoughts on “Pregnancy Tea

  1. Looks like a great tea recipe. I will pass this on to my friends. T

  2. Dandelion leaf is good source of calcium that’s mineral for growth 🙂

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